• 75 percent of adults have searched online for health-related information in the last year.
  • When faced with an actual or potential diagnosis of cancer, most people are inclined to consult Dr. Google, often before they see a real live medical expert.
  • It’s easy for people to land on a site filled with misinformation that leads them to make decisions that may not be in their best interests,” said Dr. Lidia Schapira, medical oncologist at Stanford University Medical Center.

  • Illness symptoms/treatments and medication are most frequently cited as the types of health- related information sought online.
  • Healthcare information concerns abound, particularly when it comes to credibility.
  • 83% of Healthcare Information Seekers who are exposed to health information on social media are concerned about incorrect or misleading medical information.
  • Only 35% of Healthcare Information Seekers who use social media report that, in their experience, the information on social media is mostly accurate

Source: Weber Shandwick, in partnership with KRC Research

KEY TAKEAWAY: Right now, medical devices are less rigorously regulated than drugs: Only 1 percent of medical devices get FDA approval with high-quality clinical trials behind them. Even in these cases, devices typically reach the market based on data from a single small, short-term trial, Redberg wrote in a 2014 editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine, where she called for a sham control study of stents.  So what do you do if you’re a stent patient or candidate?

An Altarum Institute survey found that most consumers seek health care information from providers, friends and family, and online searches.[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””] Of all information types, consumers are most dissatisfied with health care cost information[/inlinetweet]. This is especially true for lower-income and uninsured consumers.