Pharma companies are flush with cash and looking to make deals, but there are still a lot of small biotech companies that don’t have enough money to launch their products entirely. It seems that pharma is only interested in drugs that have the potential to sell hundreds of millions as opposed to small products that may only sell to a limited audience.

(Stat News)  Today, a study followed 380 patients being treated at community oncology groups across the U.S. after they were diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer. They told the researchers that insurance didn’t protect them from serious money problems. While 98% of them had insurance, 71% fell deeper into debt, took out a new loan, sold or refinanced a home, or experienced at least a 20% decline in income — or a combination of these over the year they answered quarterly surveys.

The estimated number of annual deaths attributable to obesity among U.S. adults is approximately 280,000 based on H.R.s from all subjects and 325,000 based on H.R.s from only nonsmokers and never-smokers. As the N.Y. Times recently reported, estimates of the medical cost of adult obesity in the United States (U.S.) range from $147 billion to nearly $210 billion per year. Most of the spending is generated from treating obesity-related diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, among others. And we continue to ignore the dangers largely.

Yes, there will be changes in healthcare in the coming years but put away the thoughts that telehealth and wearable devices will revolutionize healthcare. More and more patients demand a level of service they want with the increased costs of health insurance premiums. Here are things I believe are more realistic.

Routine cancer screening is essential to detect cancers early when it is most curable. The consequence of millions of people missing cancer screenings because of the COVID pandemic is a delay in detecting cancer, which results in cancer progressing to a more advanced stage. According to a study published in JAMA Oncology, a publication of the American Medical Association, nearly 22 million cancer screenings in the U.S. failed to happen because of the COVID-19 pandemic.