SUMMARY: Once again, the “hype” may be bigger than the reality around telehealth. First, people aren’t always completely honest with their doctors. A recent study published in the journal JAMA Network Open found that 60 to 80 percent of patients have been less than fully forthright with their doctors at some point which can be worse with telehealth. According to a survey, close to 60% of physicians have lingering reservations about the quality of care they can provide remotely.

Telehealth concerns rise

KEY TAKEAWAY:   IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science,found a significant increase in the proportion of mobile health apps that focus on health conditions and patient care, as opposed to those for general wellness. Health condition management apps now account for 40% of all health-related apps, up from 27% in 2015 .  The biggest barriers to mHealth adoption are user experience and ensuring that HCP’s accept the data.

KEY TAKEAWAY: Studies indicate people with chronic conditions want to use mHealth devices at home for care management, but the devices and apps they’re trying are too complex or confusing. More than 100,000 (health) applications are now available in the leading app stores, and the assortment is constantly growing,” says a BAEK study that was discussed at the congress. But only a fraction of the programs are certified as medical products.Mobile health apps for smartphones and tablet computers are especially popular with young people. And demand is rising. There’s a caveat, though.