Some healthcare facts we all should know

  • In a partisan political climate, leaders on both sides of the aisle have identified an urgent challenge: the price of prescription drugs. The average American pays approximately $1,200 a year for prescriptions – and that figure represents out-of-pocket costs alone.
  • Here are some facts and stats that sometimes get overlooked in the debate.
Continue reading

AARP to launch drug pricing ad campaign

IN SUMMARY: Nearly three-quarters of Americans over 50 worry about being able to afford prescription drugs for themselves and their families, according to a new AARP nationwide survey. AARP’s campaign will include television ads, a strong social and digital media presence, and grassroots efforts via mail, email, and phone by AARP’s 38 million members, in order to convince lawmakers to act on drug pricing.   

Continue reading

Pharma not seen in a ba​d light ​despite media stories

IN SUMMARY: While the media has been doing their best to point the finger at pharma companies for high drug prices patients seem to have other ideas according to research. They understand that the drugs they are taking help them lead better, more productive lives and while the prices on some drugs are high they see it as a warning for could happen if changes aren’t made.

Continue reading

6 Year old DTC study is not​ applicable today

  • A CMI/Compass study in 2013 suggested a dip in physician support for DTC with less than half (48%) indicating that DTC advertising informed, educated, and empowered patients. And, a slight majority (53%) of physicians who responded to the survey were opposed to DTC advertising.
  • 78% feel that Direct-to-Consumer advertising leads to a preference for brand name drugs when a generic is adequate
  • Only 20% of physicians agree (5% strongly; 15% somewhat) that Direct-to-Consumer pharmaceutical advertising strengthens a patient’s relationship with a clinician
Continue reading

What happened to Millenial health?

  • According to the Lancet “from 1995 to 2014, there were 14,672,409 incident cases for 30 types of cancer. Incidence significantly increased for six of 12 obesity-related cancers in young adults (25–49 years) with steeper rises in successively younger generations.
  • The risk of cancer is increasing in young adults for half of the obesity-related cancers, with the increase steeper in progressively younger ages.
  • Obesity has been repeatedly linked to an increased risk of certain cancers. The World Health Organization has called obesity a “rising epidemic”, with over 1 billion adults considered obese worldwide.
Continue reading