SUMMARY:

  • The FDA has many puzzled as to why they approve some drugs with questionable data and ask for more data on other drugs.
  • The FDA approves drugs on the potential to save a life, the cost of the drugs is never considered in the process.
  • The FDA has been under criticism, but an internal investigation will focus on approval processes, not “why” a drug was approved.
  • Our healthcare system cannot continue to support marginally effective drugs. We need to learn to say NO.
  • Drug companies know how to play the system.

SUMMARY: The approval of Biogen’s Alzheimer’s drug, after its advisory panel turned it down, begs the Inspector General to open an investigation into the FDA. Biogen’s $56,000 drug is proof that it was never about the science; it’s about a lifesaver for a sinking company. In the meantime, caregivers are going to put their hope in a drug that doesn’t work and in garbage science with cherry-picked data.

  • 89 percent of the public favors requiring the Food and Drug Administration [FDA] to review prescription-drug ads for accuracy before they are broadcast.
  • A survey of patients by Prevention Magazine in 2012 showed that [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]71 percent of people agree that DTC advertisements “allow people to be more involved with their health care” and 75 percent believe that DTC ads are useful because they “tell people about new treatments.[/inlinetweet]
  • Prevention’s survey also found that [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]76 percent of Americans talked to their physicians about a condition after seeing a DTC ad [/inlinetweet]and among those who discussed a specific medicine that was advertised with their physician, [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]only 20 percent received the prescription of the advertised medicine.[/inlinetweet]
  • Fair balance in DTC TV ads is not necessary as the vast majority of patients will go online to learn about drug side effects.
  • Drug companies are left out of social media conversations because they lack FDA guidelines.