SUMMARY:

  • The FDA has many puzzled as to why they approve some drugs with questionable data and ask for more data on other drugs.
  • The FDA approves drugs on the potential to save a life, the cost of the drugs is never considered in the process.
  • The FDA has been under criticism, but an internal investigation will focus on approval processes, not “why” a drug was approved.
  • Our healthcare system cannot continue to support marginally effective drugs. We need to learn to say NO.
  • Drug companies know how to play the system.
Drug companies know how to play the <strong>FDA</strong> drug approval process

SKIMMERS SUMMARY:

  • Jefferies analysts found doctors have shown strong interest in prescribing Aduhelm for about 35% of early-stage Alzheimer’s patients with mild cognitive impairment after surveying 50 U.S. neurologists or psychiatrists currently treating about 12,000 Alzheimer’s patients. Source: Fierce Pharma
  • If that enthusiasm pans out in the long run, it could mean at least 300,000 patients taking the drug, or $10 billion to $15 billion in peak Aduhelm from U.S. sales alone, which is above consensus estimates of around $7 billion to $8 billion, the team said.
  •  One agency FDA adviser, resigning from his committee post in protest, called it “probably the worst drug approval decision in recent U.S. history.” Source: STAT News
  • Our healthcare system can’t continue to support drugs that don’t have good clinical outcomes behind them.
<strong>The <strong>FDA</strong> and Aduhelm:</strong><em> <strong>WTF</strong>?</em>

KEY POINTS:

  • Winston Churchill once said, “However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.
  • Display ads are usually reported to have an overall click rate of about five clicks in ten thousand ads served. If you want to know why the web is so appallingly littered with ads, it’s because to get five clicks you have to run 10,000 ads.
  •  60% of the clicks are reported to be mistakes.
  • You are more likely to complete Navy Seal training than click on a banner ad. According to research company Lumen, only 9% of banner ads are even noticed for a second.
  • Studies show that CTRs have little to no correlation to ad effectiveness, yet it is still the most widely utilized measurement (or Key Performance Indicator, in ad jargon) of online advertising performance.

Source: Bob Hoffman

<strong>DTC</strong> Managers guide to online ads