• The Apple Heart Study, conducted by Stanford University researchers and sponsored by Apple, evaluated the ability of the Apple Watch to detect atrial fibrillation, a common heart disorder also known as A-fib, in an astonishing 400,000 participants.
  • The study was not a randomized controlled trial, the gold standard of medical research.
  • It’s a purely observational study designed to see whether the Apple Watch’s heart pulse monitor can identify people who have a-fib.
  • A leading cardiologist told me “the study is really moot and doesn’t change my views on the Apple watch for patients”
  • Recent national surveys show health care costs are a top concern in U.S. households
  •  In 2017, more than half (56%) of people under age 65 — about 152 million people — had insurance through an employer.
  • Average premiums for employer health plans rose sharply in 2017.
  • The average annual deductible for single-person policies rose to $1,808 in 2017.
  • ombined, average employee premium contributions and potential out-of-pocket spending to meet deductibles across single and family policies rose to $7,240 in 2017 and was $8,000 or more in eight states.

IN SUMMARY: With health-care firms making excess profits of $65bn a year the worst offenders are not pharma firms but an army of corporate health-care middlemen. Total excess profits amount to only about 4% of America’s health-care spending. But this still makes health care the second biggest of the giant rent-seeking industries that have come to dominate parts of the economy. The excess profits of the health-care firms are equivalent to $200 per American per year, compared with $69 for the telecoms and cable TV industry and $25 captured by the airline oligopoly. Only the five big tech “platform” firms, with a figure of $250, are more brazen gougers.

  • Most people — 71% — said they trust drug companies to come up with new and effective drugs.
  • But 80% said industry profits are a major factor in high drug prices.
  • 75% said it’s easy to afford their prescriptions, and 45% said they pay less than $25 per month. Unsurprisingly, poorer people and those in worse health had a harder time covering their bills. Source: Kaiser Family Foundation