The estimated number of annual deaths attributable to obesity among U.S. adults is approximately 280,000 based on H.R.s from all subjects and 325,000 based on H.R.s from only nonsmokers and never-smokers. As the N.Y. Times recently reported, estimates of the medical cost of adult obesity in the United States (U.S.) range from $147 billion to nearly $210 billion per year. Most of the spending is generated from treating obesity-related diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, among others. And we continue to ignore the dangers largely.

Yes, there will be changes in healthcare in the coming years but put away the thoughts that telehealth and wearable devices will revolutionize healthcare. More and more patients demand a level of service they want with the increased costs of health insurance premiums. Here are things I believe are more realistic.

With days to go before Christmas, Americans are sick and tired of being sick and tired. Of reworking plans to adapt to the latest virus risks. Of searching for at-home tests and not finding them. Of wondering whether, after two years of avoiding Covid-19, or surviving it, or getting vaccinated and maybe even boosted, Omicron is the variant they inevitably catch. (N.Y. Times). Will this affect healthcare?