The latest KFF COVID-19 Monitor finds that fatigue and frustration dominate the public’s mood as the U.S. nears the pandemic’s second anniversary. While partisans have often been split in their pandemic attitudes, roughly three in four Democrats, independents, and Republicans say they feel “tired” and “frustrated,” and similar shares say they think it is likely that most people in the U.S. will eventually get infected with COVID-19.

OPENING: In an era of media sensationalism, I have come to appreciate good journalism. When it comes to healthcare, my number one choice is STAT News, but I have also found the Financial Times and The Economist to be excellent sources. Below is a summary of an in-depth article from the Finacial Times on Pfizer and their COVID vaccine. It’s beyond damning; it’s a reflection of an industry that values profits above all else.

SUMMARY: According to Pew Internet “Despite antibiotics’ vital role in cancer care, companies have abandoned their development in favor of more profitable drugs. A pull strategy is needed with financial incentives to repair the broken market for antibiotics and make it worthwhile for the pharma industry to bring promising drugs to market.

IN SUMMARY: According to a Takeda Oncology report “for people diagnosed with multiple myeloma, there can be an abundance of information, which can lead to confusion around the next steps in their diagnosis and treatment plan. Particularly, there appears to be a disconnect between what they understand and what they want to know about the treatment journey that lies ahead. This knowledge gap can manifest feelings of anxiety and uncertainty in people with multiple myeloma, which is counterproductive to having open dialogues with their physician on treatment decisions. This is an opportunity to make a difference.

COVID-19 has disrupted traditional healthcare person-to-person communication and accelerated digital options, such as telehealth and remote patient-clinician contacts, digital therapeutics that deliver remote patient monitoring, and interventions through the use of software. But is this really the future? Medscape conducted some research in May to find out.