Routine cancer screening is essential to detect cancers early when it is most curable. The consequence of millions of people missing cancer screenings because of the COVID pandemic is a delay in detecting cancer, which results in cancer progressing to a more advanced stage. According to a study published in JAMA Oncology, a publication of the American Medical Association, nearly 22 million cancer screenings in the U.S. failed to happen because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

When obesity has become a national health crisis caused by overeating and lack of exercise, a body positivity website has created free “Don’t Weigh Me” cards for patients who find stepping on the scale at the doctor’s office stressful. The group supports a “Health at Every Size” philosophy, based around the assumption that “the current practice of linking weight to health using BMI (body mass Index) standards is biased and unhelpful.” An analysis predicts that by 2030, 48.9% of adults in the United States will be obese, and 24.2% will be severely obese.

With days to go before Christmas, Americans are sick and tired of being sick and tired. Of reworking plans to adapt to the latest virus risks. Of searching for at-home tests and not finding them. Of wondering whether, after two years of avoiding Covid-19, or surviving it, or getting vaccinated and maybe even boosted, Omicron is the variant they inevitably catch. (N.Y. Times). Will this affect healthcare?

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), in 2021, the average cost of employee health insurance premiums for family coverage increased by 4% from the previous year to $22,221. The average annual premiums for an individual’s plan also increased 4% to $7,739 this year. Why haven’t more employers addressed the rising costs of employee healthcare with value-based care?