Generic drug prices are spiking

  • Forty-five states and the Department of Justice are claiming that generic-drug prices are fixed and the alleged collusion may have cost U.S. business and consumers more than $1 billion.
  • The prices of some generic drugs, such as captopril (Capoten) and pyrimethamine (Daraprim), have risen substantially in recent years.
  • Pharma companies have raised the prices of 43 generic drugs by at least 10% so far in the first half of 2018.
  • Prior to going generic, many brand-name drugs see large increases in their cash price, with prices rising by as much as 50%.

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Generic Drugs Shows A Four-to-One Lead Over Branded

ucm331956POST SUMMARY: A new Harris Poll finds Americans favor generic prescription drugs over brand name products by a considerable margin. Eighty-one percent of those who buy prescription drugs say they would purchase generics more often than brand name drugs. A 42% subset goes so far as to assert that they would “always” choose to buy a generic drug. Older generations are especially likely to indicate that they would always go with generics (50% Matures, 44% Baby Boomers, and 46% Gen X vs. 33% Millennials). Continue reading

Is the FDA falling down on generics?

fridaynewsPOST SUMMARY: Eight out of 10 prescriptions written in the United States are filled with the no-brand name, generic version of the drug prescribed by a doctor.  The FDA mandates that generic forms of prescription medication contain the same active ingredient as the brand name, but the agency allows the generic version to use different inactive ingredients, including binders to hold the pill together and time release agents to disperse it. Continue reading

Generic medications: Are they really the same?

genericdrugsAccording to Fiercepharma “generics make up about 80% of the drugs U.S. consumers use, but there has long been questions about whether some of them work as well as the products they mimic. Now the FDA is finding out. The new effort follows the agency’s finding in 2012 that a generic of Wellbutrin XL, a long-release version of the antidepressant, that was made by Teva Pharmaceutical Industries did not act like the original” Continue reading