Online health seekers don’t trust social media

  • Illness symptoms/treatments and medication are most frequently cited as the types of health- related information sought online.
  • Healthcare information concerns abound, particularly when it comes to credibility.
  • 83% of Healthcare Information Seekers who are exposed to health information on social media are concerned about incorrect or misleading medical information.
  • Only 35% of Healthcare Information Seekers who use social media report that, in their experience, the information on social media is mostly accurate

Source: Weber Shandwick, in partnership with KRC Research

Continue reading

Online health seekers don’t trust social media

  • A new survey profiling how American adults’ access, use and feels about health-related information finds that most American social media users who regularly seek health information are concerned about incorrect or misleading medical information on social media, and few have found health information on social media to be accurate.
  • Two-thirds of American Healthcare Information Seekers (67 percent) report that they see health information on social media. The types of information they see on social media are mostly wellness advice (56 percent) and advertisements for treatments or medications (52 percent).
  • More than eight in 10 Healthcare Information Seekers who have seen health information on social media (83 percent) say they are concerned about incorrect or misleading medical information.
  • The youngest cohort in our study, Gen Z, is just as likely to be concerned about incorrect or misleading information as the much older Boomer generation (91 percent and 87 percent, respectively).

Continue reading

Social Media and health: the conversations are around experiences, both good and bad

  • Social networking use among Internet users ages 50 and older has nearly doubled –from   22%   to   42%.
  • This demographic is a sweet spot for healthcare marketers.
  • News sites still remain the most trusted online healthcare resource (68 percent), while user-generated contributions on Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and blogs are used less frequently (54 percent), according to results from a national consumer survey conducted by Makovsky + Company. Continue reading

The use of social media in pharma: DTC or engagement?

  • The IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics states that “the strategies that pharmaceutical companies use to engage with social media could be categorized as low-risk and less innovative than those employed in other industries.”
  • The pharmaceutical industry has been slow to embrace social media.
  • One reason is the lack of guidance from health regulators about using social media. In the US, for example.
  • Users of social media now expect to be able to have a conversation with pharmaceutical companies when they face uncertainties.

Continue reading

Pharma should avoid Facebook at all costs

KEY TAKEAWAY: Facebook’s objective was to keep users addicted to social media as much as possible, but now that Facebook has become nothing but a media company they don’t want to play by the same rules as other media companies.  The risks of advertising on Facebook are too great while the rewards are too few. Continue reading