Ten companies controlled half of the health care industry’s $50 billion of global profits 9 of those 10 companies at the top are pharma firms

  • Americans spend a lot more money on hospital and physician care than prescription drugs, but pharmaceutical companies pocket a lot more of than other parts of the industry. (Source: Axios)
  • 63% of the profit total went to drug companies, even though they collected 23% of the revenue
  • Pfizer had the highest profit total ($4.1 billion) of any publicly traded health care company in the third quarter.
  • Of the 19 companies that tallied at least $1 billion of third-quarter profit, 14 were drug companies.

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Spending more money on TV ads doesn’t make sense

  • In 2019, people are expected to spend an average of 170.6 minutes each day on online activities like watching videos on YouTube, sharing photos on Facebook and shopping on Amazon. They’ll spend slightly less time — 170.3 minutes —watching TV.
  • In the U.S., however, TV is still king. Internet usage will not eclipse TV viewing there until 2020, according to Zenith.
  • Most advertisers are ahead of the curve, except pharma.. Globally, they’re expected to spend $60 billion more on internet than TV advertising in 2019.
  • 80 percent of Internet users, or about 93 million Americans, have searched for a health-related topic online, according to a study by the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

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Disruption in the drug industry does not need to cease because of the “ecosystem”

  • The drug industry cannot continue to do business “as usual” and ignore the concern about drug prices.
  • Prices of many of the most popular brand-name drugs increased at nearly ten times the cost of inflation from 2012 to 2017.
  • At least 28 million Americans have experienced a spike in the cost of their prescription medications in the past 12 months.
  • 67% of drug companies increased their annual profit margins during between 2006 and 2015—with margins up to 20 percent for some companies in certain years.

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Takeda Shire train wreck

KEY THOUGHT:  Takeda announced the sale overnight, with Shire’s board accepting Weber’s offer of £49 a share, which values the company at £46 billion. Now he’ll have to sell it to shareholders — which is not a given after Takeda saw its market cap plunge more than 20% during the talks.  Why did Takeda buy Shire?  Nothing more than a pissing match. Continue reading