Little evidence that apps can effectively reduce lifestyle diseases

imgresThe Journal of Health Communication recently published a paper raising serious concerns about the attention and hope piled onto such technology, largely because so much of it was “unsupervised” and relied on patients’ faithfully recording their activities.  This year researchers at Johns Hopkins published one of the first papers to put health apps through a sort of rigorous equivalent to medical trials. The findings showed the apps were mediocre at best. Most of the apps’ ability to manage disease was of “low quality, and nearly all were undertaken in high-income countries,” they wrote.  Continue reading “Little evidence that apps can effectively reduce lifestyle diseases”