Monthly Archives: November 2017

Social media playing “whack the mole” with illegal drug marketing

KEY TAKEAWAY: According to Business Insider “the inability of giant Internet companies to keep illegal drug sellers off their sites shows that it’s not just fake news , hate speech, violent videos and foreign political propaganda that are overwhelming their content-filtering systems”. Another reason to avoid social media for pharma? Continue reading

Digital health could be, might be, is poised to…..

KEY TAKEAWAY: There are over 318,000 health apps and 340 consumer wearable devices are now available worldwide .  Since 2015, over 153,000 new Digital Health apps were introduced to the Apple Store and Google Play, nearly doubling the number available, with more than 200 health apps being added each day and those  focused on health condition management — often associated with patient care — are growing and now account for 40% of all apps.  But in order for digital health to really “take off” consumers have to use them as designed and physicians have to believe that the data is accurate.

Continue reading

Pharma should avoid Facebook at all costs

KEY TAKEAWAY: Facebook’s objective was to keep users addicted to social media as much as possible, but now that Facebook has become nothing but a media company they don’t want to play by the same rules as other media companies.  The risks of advertising on Facebook are too great while the rewards are too few. Continue reading

Diabetes was the condition with the greatest increase in spending

Diabetes sweet on plate

KEY TAKEAWAY: Health care spending in the United States increased by about $933.5 billion between 1996 and 2013, according to an analysis published Tuesday in the medical journal JAMA. Diabetes was the condition with the greatest increase in spending, rising by $64.4 billion between 1996 and 2013. Most of this money went to pharmaceuticals prescribed to treat it. Continue reading

The confusing world of online health information

KEY TAKEAWAY: Right now, medical devices are less rigorously regulated than drugs: Only 1 percent of medical devices get FDA approval with high-quality clinical trials behind them. Even in these cases, devices typically reach the market based on data from a single small, short-term trial, Redberg wrote in a 2014 editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine, where she called for a sham control study of stents.  So what do you do if you’re a stent patient or candidate? Continue reading