What frustrates online health seekers on pharma websites?

UnknownPOST SUMMARY: While your web analytics might indicate that you are getting a lot of traffic to your product website upstream and downstream analysis indicates that visitors are also going to other health websites to both fact check your claims and help them better understand complicated health language. Continue reading »

The power of insurers to deny medication

UnknownPOST SUMMARY: This is a guest post that clearly demonstrates that insurers are having a bigger say in what medications patients need and want.  It’s a challenge and with new drug prices climbing sky high I believe we are going to see more and more insurers dictate what can and can’t be prescribed. Continue reading »

Problems related to online health information seeking

UnknownPOST SUMMARY:  As health care systems around the world shift toward models that emphasize self-care management, there is increasing pressure for patients to obtain health information online.  Overall online health seekers display awareness of potential problems related to online health information seeking.   The need for enhanced patient communication skills and eHealth literacy assessments that are accompanied by targeted resources pointing individuals to high-quality credible online health information, and the need to remind patients of the importance of consulting a medical professional when they use online health resources to diagnose and treat a health issue is a substantial gap. Continue reading »

What do patients want from pharma?

Build-a-user-friendly-website-with-TimeZ-MarketingPOST SUMMARY: Believe it or not patients do want to hear from pharma brands via digital channels, but patient expectations have to be in line with product websites or else they are turning elsewhere to make health care decisions. Continue reading »

No amount of innovation can justify the doubling of prices for cancer drugs

shutterstock_614148POST SUMMARY: The number of over-65s on the planet is projected almost to triple between 2010 and 2050 to 1.5bn, according to the UN. This, in turn, will spur a surge in age-related diseases such as cancer. The World Health Organization predicts the number of cases will increase 70 per cent in the next 20 years.  Global spending on cancer drugs has more than doubled in the past decade to $91bn in 2013, according to the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. However, can the US healthcare system really afford $100,000 drugs?

Source: Financial Times “Counting the cost of cancer” Continue reading »